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Reliable Sources

Series/Special. Examining media coverage and how it can shape the news. New. (CC)

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CNN

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01:01:00

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San Francisco, CA, USA

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mpeg2video

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ac3

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1920

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1080

TOPIC FREQUENCY

Washington 9, Bill Keller 8, Us 8, Benghazi 8, Glenn Greenwald 7, Max 6, Citi 5, U.s. 5, America 4, Humira 4, Unitedhealthcare 4, Glen Greenwald 3, Fbi 3, Norfolk 3, Mr. Davies 2, Snowden 2, Lindsey Graham 2, David Folkenflik 2, Emily Bell 2, Hepatitis B 2,
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  CNN    Reliable Sources    Series/Special. Examining media coverage  
   and how it can shape the news. New. (CC)  

    November 3, 2013
    8:00 - 9:01am PST  

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border between afghanistan and china. 3.5 hours. so perhaps you can have dinner in china and step across the border into afghanistan and there's still time for a late lunch. anyone know a good lunch spot? thanks to all of you for being part of my program this week. i'll see you next week. stay tuned for "reliable sources." across the atlantic, a case that promises to reveal secrets on how rupert murdoch's tabloids really operated and cozy relations of his editors with tom law enforcement officials and revelations stemming from charges of phone bribe bribery. >> accused of snooping for snoops by eavesdropping. >> it will be fascinating to hear what comes out of it. it changed how the tabloid media
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operated in great britain. >> the court was told the "news of the world" paid private investigator in excess of 100,000 pounds a year for his hacking duties. prosecutors say this must have required high level approval. >> a source whose credibility has been challenged. we'll look at a story and that source and how it has become a political football. plus, an intense exchange between two journalistic heavy weights. bill keller of "the new york times" and glenn greenwald of the guardian square off. and if you thought to start a new 24-hour cable channel, you might not promote it like this. ♪
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>> those were actors but that was the debut of fusion tv. a new news outlet showing more of "glee" as it appeals to a diverse generation of young viewers. i'm david folkenflik and this is "reliable sources." good morning good morning. i'm david folkenflik of m prpr news. this week marked the start of a trial on charges that editors conspired to hack into mobile phone messages and bribe police and other government officials for information that was supposed to be kept private. it was the bestselling newspaper of news corp shut down two years
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ago when the scandal hit its height. the most surprising revelation involved evidence that two had an affair lasting six years. to discuss coverage this week, we have emily bell, and she's the former director of digital guardian and in london on, we have peter jukes covering drama for "the daily beast." what have we learned this week? >> the obvious thing is the affair. that wasn't fascinating to me because it was followed in prosecutor's allegations about the affairs and way that journalists were approaching affairs of two senior ministers, two home secretaries and john prescott, deputy prime minister.
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fascinating combination of an affair among two senior tabloid journalists and then whatever means we don't know yet presenting ministers with their affairs and threatening to expose them. >> so far this is all based on allegations presented by prosecutors of course. defense hasn't even started to make a case. >> exactly. i was going to say the other thing is that three editors in succession pleaded in the case. >> emily bell, what surprised you in the months and even in two years since the hacking scandal broke into the open about the way in which the murdoch press against which you used to compete operates? >> well, i guess when you cover the u.k. press, which i used to as a media correspondent, you're sort of aware there are a series of practices that people talk about but you never really see
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them exposed. as peter was saying, the way that the press operated in stark truth and in other words going into minister's offices saying we know you're having an affair and seeing back story of how widespread this was, you know, that's shocking even if you knew about it. the other thing which has been very surprising in the past two years is how much impact it's had on overall press in the u.k. there's been a great deal of debate and finally a conclusion as to how the press should no longer be regulated but regulated from if you like a royal by parliament and that's a huge change. there's been a very tumultuous period in british journalism. it hasn't quite reached here in the way we thought it would. >> restrictions you describe that have been proposed beaten
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around by various political figures there and various press industry figures there of course offer restrictions and limitations that would be different for journalists here. i wonder if we can go back to an affair for a moment. you see two tabloid editors intent on sending reporters not just according to prosecutors but according to the coverage in there out to report on the private lives of these people but the secret they themselves hold while married and they have a romantic involvement, is there anything more than to it than that or simply a symbolism of private lives and they span industry and in mr. coulson's case, governmental positions? >> i think it's a key part of the prosecution case. that what andy coulson knew, brooks knew because we have that crossing over. she went to the sun. not mentioned to just put out
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private lives that they had intimate contact. there was mention in court an invoice from private investigators, hacked a phone that said million dollar voice messages and invoice was paid in full. i think it's much more about that. the salacious stuff about affair is prosecution case to say they were working it together and therefore there's a conspiracy. >> peter, i wonder, we're talking about different regulations and restrictions on the press. in coverage of this trial as all trials in the u.k., limitations are not faced by reporters in the u.s. >> it's very difficult. i've been to a lot of pretrial hearings. let's say there are many pages of restrictions. to be fair to the prosecutors and the court really, in the u.s. we have article six, human
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rights convention. a fair trial is more important than freedom of speech. there's lots to stop any juror being prejudiced by stuff that's inadmissible or guilty pleas which we've known about for a while. the jury could not know beforehand. different from the american system. very complicated for a reporter. >> different balance being struck in the u.k. than in the u.s. restrictions at a time where we talk about newsrooms allegationallegation is they were operating beyond the law. thank you for joining us to talk about this topic. after the break, a "60 minutes" report includes a new eyewitness account from the attack in benghazi and ignites a new firestorm. we'll look at the argument next. n is going to grow by over 90 million people, and almost all that growth is going to be in cities. what's the healthiest and best way for them to grow so that they really become cauldrons of prosperity
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>> in the year since the attack in benghazi, many say the whole story about what happened was yet to be told. a new report on "60 minutes" including a never before heard eyewitness account from a british security officer. >> one guy shouted. i couldn't believe he seen me because it was so dark. he started walking toward me. >> as he was coming closer --
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>> i hit him with the butt of the rifle in the face. >> that report inspired republican senator lindsey graham to make a renewed call for hearings but it also inspired questions about that eyewitness. "the washington post" reported that the security agent had filed an after-action report telling a different tale. last night the security contractor dylan davies told the daily beast he didn't write the report and was smeared. joining me here in washington to help sort out that story and implication, eli lake who co-wrote that story and ryan lizza. eli, how do you evaluate credibility in a case like this where you see conflicting versions of accounts about what happened? >> it's difficult. josh and i are still trying to get another corroboration witnesses of exactly what mr. davies/jones did that evening. i would say this. what he told us about how he
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disobeyed orders from his superior and lied to him coheres to what he wrote in his book. this is not an explanation that comes after this memo is there. the memo itself we couldn't find the signature of davies and the fact he says he didn't write it adds more context to this story. >> does it matter at some point he seems to have given a conflicting account that if he was there on that day, he was involved in confronting a terrorist. i'm willing to give a guy a pass on a jaywalking ticket but at some point he gave a different account. >> there are a couple questions here. the issue -- the difference between the two accounts is very dramatic, right? in one account the memo that he tells you he did not write but his superior wrote based on a conversation with him he doesn't go there that night. in the very dramatic book and "60 minutes" segment he said i went there and scaled a 12-foot wall and killed a terrorist with a butt of a gun.
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as a journalist when i see a dramatic difference like that, you have to wonder if he's telling the truth on that specific issue. the larger question of even if he made up that part of the story, does his -- what is he adding to the benghazi story? he's adding another voice that the security situation in benghazi before attack was very bad and that the administration should have known about that. i think we already knew that before he came forward. and if administration's goal is to discredit him -- >> a leak to "the washington post." >> by leaking this memo which doesn't comport with what he told "60 minutes" and he wrote in his book. that seems to be the reason. i think, you know, reporters like eli who have been following this story more closely than i have i assume will get to the bottom of this. there are other witnesses. there should be other reports. one way or another we'll find out if the story is true or not. >> he understand that "60 minutes" did not know about this
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conflicting report that doesn't bear his signature on it. in the absence of that knowledge, you know, it seems it's hard for "60 minutes" to have addressed that. at the same time, your understanding of benghazi given your coverage of this, does this affect the larger narrative in any way to have some perhaps vulnerability? >> there are so many other people that have come forward about warnings and security situation and how there wasn't enough done in terms of diplomatdiplomat ic security and other things. there are two other accounts that exist that have been debriefed of mr. davies/jones. one is intelligence agencies after he landed from benghazi and the other a few weeks later fbi came to his home in whales. >> consistency gives you confidence. >> i would like to see those reports and if anybody in the administration would like to leak them, it's
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elilake@thedailybeast. >> did he tell you his story to those folks is consistent with what he said on "60 minutes"? >> he said that what i told the fbi -- what i told these others is consistent with what's in my memoir and consistent with what i said. >> i want to quickly get to one question. it seems to me that this story and cbs has been aggressive on it, used as a political football in some ways and coverage of this story itself has been part of the political discourse. tell me what the stakes are for people like republicans on the hill and for people like hillary clinton who was secretary of state at the time of this. >> you have lindsey graham who is in a very tough republican primary in south carolina now saying he's going to hold up all of the obama nominees until he gets additional answers on benghazi. there are people that still haven't been interviewed that he wants. you know, for better or worse, this is one of those stories where all liberals believe it's overblown and all conservatives believe it's the heart of a dark conspiracy and there's not a lot of people that look objectively
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at the case. it's one of those weird stories in our political culture that becomes completely polarized. that's that believe that benghazi is a big coverup won't change their mind and folks that think hillary clinton did nothing wrong won't change their mind. i doubt this will be a huge political issue for her going forward. >> a moment where politics makes the journalism of this polarized as well. thank you both so much for coming in to talk about this today. >> thank you. after the break, to be impartial or adversarial? how is journalism best practiced? bill keller and glenn greenwald take sides.
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bill keller served as foreign correspondent and is now a columnist on the opinion pages and that's where he thinks opinions should stay. he watched the disclosure of nsa secrets by "the guardian" this year with interest as glenn greenwald champion eed as ed a e
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adversarial. he argued that impartiality is flawed and that people who are willing to not only acknowledge beliefs but publicly. what's wrong with that approach? >> there's nothing wrong with that approach. it's not the only approach that works. there has been greated adversarl coverage over the years. they were going after the trusts and corrupt political machines and they wrote with real edge to
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them. they also had the facts. they had the information. but more and more we're now in an era where thanks to the internet anybody with broadband access can be a commentator. that's great. the effect of the internet has been by in large a good thing. it's pulled mainstream media down from the god-like stature that it had for so long. that's terrific. i think in that world more than ever when you have these points of view, it's really useful to have somebody who tries to sort of play the arbiter. you know, the shortcoming of activist or adversarial journalism is two-fold. if you go into a story with you know what's right, you won't listen to opposing points of view and gave them the same
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respect. you should go into news coverage with some sort of humility. a lot of times the stuff that we really think we know is wrong and we should be prepared to have that proven in the course of our investigation. the other thing is if you declare your point of view publicly, the other thing that kicks in is this human nature, the sense of pride. once you have announced that you are for x, there is at least subconsciously a temptation to stick up for that point of view in your writing and to frame the debate in a way that's not impartial. >> in your response it sounds like the intensity of reporting that appears on pages of "the new york times" certain values like humility and civility and respectfulness. these are not ones i would
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ascribe to glen greenwald. he suggests in your extensive exchange it kind of gets in the way of the kind of toughest questions and truth telling he thinks people need to hear. obviously he refers to events in not just history but failure of the press corps at large like wmds and others that led up to the iraq war. it will fail to get at the heart of the question and get under the official utterances. >> you know, sometimes he put in our exchange portrays it as if impartial journalist do stenography. you take down what one guy asay and what the other one says and there is no judgment implied. no one that reads "the new york times" or "the washington post" or any of the sort of serious mainstream news organizations believes that. civility means you listen respectfully up to the point
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where somebody is lying to you and if somebody is lying to you and you can demonstrate it, you say so. you know, humility means that you offer people a chance to poke holes in whatever working thesis you have developed. but it doesn't mean, for example, that you give equal time for people who deny climate change. >> we have certainly seen instances of that. you know, there are moments -- >> false ekwiquivalenequivalenc. >> you make a distinction between the idea of objectivity and impartiality. they see the concepts as being roughly the same thing. tell me about the distinction you draw in your mind about these ideas? >> over the years objective is applied to journalism we do indiscriminately. i avoid the word because it implies an absolute pure truth. it's the objective truth. and in fact most of what we do,
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whether it's what i do or what "times" reporters do or what glen greenwald does is aspirational. we're trying to get at the truth but, you know, be wary of the guy who says he has the absolute truth. >> could one not argue in the digital age in this time where we can all access anything we want at element any time newswise, that you almost need each other to co-exist. "times" can validate certain things but leverage things that enforce topics in a way you may feel you can't quite responsibly do. >> there is some truth in that. i think, you know, you can read the comments on our exchange and you'll see there are people out there who think that glenn greenwald and edward snowden should be locked up if not hung. there is a lot of passion around this subject. i think that on the whole,
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greenwald as journalist and snowden as the leaker have forced us to face to have a debate that is long overdue. and to deal with the fact that there is inadequate accountability for the kind of information gathering that goes on in our intelligence community. i think sometimes people like glen greenwald or julian assange bring us brokers of information for one reason or another wouldn't get and they serve a purpose by goting us when we slack and we do. newspapers are put out by human beings and human beings make mistakes. i think, yes, there is uneasy and sometimes contentious but we co-exist and sometim--
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>> we'll put a link up on cnn's "reliable sources" website. bill keller, thank you for coming in today and joining us. >> next, my conversation with glenn greenwald on why he thinks bill keller and "the new york times" had formula for journalism exactly backward. ♪ norfolk southern what's your function? ♪
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welcome back to "reliable sources." we heard bill keller's view that it is important that reporters leave their views at home. glenn greenwald is pursuing adversarial journalism. he joined me from rio de janeiro. thank you so much for joining us. >> good to be with you. >> as we just heard from bill keller, a debate broke out here. tell me why you engaged in this back and forth and what you feel you learned from it. >> it's a debate that has been percolating in media for at least ten years or so since the advent of blogs, which really
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arose out of dissatisfaction with large media outlets and there's a split among journalists about the traditional rules for how reporters have to conduct themselves which are recent despite how institutional they have become are really optimal or whether a looser and more passionate form of new media reporting is something that producing better journalism and so i think we represent both schools very purely and so it would be opportunity to have a debate i thought was instructive in lots of different ways. >> he concedes the role that an opinionated press in some ways advocacy press played over the years, decades and throughout american history and at the same time, you know, in your exchange with bill keller you called it fundamentally dishonest of reporters working for self-described impartial news outlets and not to put on the table and cards their own personal beliefs they might express at home.
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why is that dishonest in your terms? >> it's pretending to be something they cannot possibly be. human beings, all of us, are subjective human beings. we perceive the world through high subjective prisms whether it be nationalistic or cultural or religious or socioeconomic or all sorts of other experiences that shape the way we look at the world and what assumptions we embrace that are debatable and subjective. i think it's honest and healthy to hetell readers these are outcomes i hope to see achieved and here's my reporting in context of what i'm telling you truthfully are the ways i look at the world that you can then incorporate into how you assess what i'm telling you. "the new york times" and other media stations pretend not to have those and pretend to float above it and to have objective perspective that is deceitful
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and not how how many beings perceive the world. >> i asked bill about that. the idea that that sense of who i might be or who another reporter might be as political animal may not be what gets a reporter out of bed in the morning. it may not be what animates them in the way it does someone like you. bill keller says it's in some ways the only way he thinks you can arrive at putting together assembling the truth from facts you find opposed to finding the truth and direction you're already looking. >> look, i think there's room for all of it. let readers decide which we find most valuable. important thing to realize here is that it isn't new media people for lack of a better word like myself arguing this way of doing things is corrupting and invalid and shouldn't be permitted. i recognize that institutes
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develop good journalism. a model is suffocating on everyone else. the context of our debate is that bill said he never would have allowed me as someone that expresses opinions to take the lead on reporting on nsa stories. my argument is this view that unless you pretend not to have opinions and you conceal from readers all of the things you think you can't be a good journalist is illegitimate. what determines whether you're a good journalist is not whether you abide by obsolete rules for how you behave but how what you're saying and telling readers is accurate and factual. that's good journalism. there are different ways to do that. >> i want to turn to your new venture with the co-founder of ebay. he'll plunk down a significant amount of money to create anew instead of buying something like "the washington post" but to spend a couple hundred million dollars doing this. what will this allow you that "the guardian" hasn't afforded
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you in recent months as you pursued these snowden revelat n revelations. >> the opportunity that i was presented, which is to help build a new media organization from the ground up and one that's designed from the beginning to maximize and empower the independence of adversarial journalism is something i found irresistible to do different and innovative things. a big part of what we intend to do is to eliminate these sort of obsolete relics and constraints on how journalists behave and the spirit of it that says it's designed to be an adversary to those who hold greatest power economically and politically. that's really the vision that we're building and pursuing. >> just to end where we started.
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bill keller said i respect the idea of adversarial journalism and at the same time civility and respect means you listen and hear things that you would otherwise miss as you try to hold accountable holding feet to the fire of those who control government. what's wrong with the idea of a little humility and civility in the mix? >> the problem with places like "the new york times" and similar institutions is that the civility and listening and humility tends to get directed toward the most powerful people in our society. the ones that need checks the greatest. that's why "the new york times" record over the last ten years with things like laundering false claims about iraqi wmds that led us to a horrible war or suppressing news of the wiretapping an other kind of suppression of information that political officials asked them to suppress that the public had a right to know that had effect of misleading the public. that's what happens when you
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accumulate too excessively and engage with those in power. powerless deserve to be heard and need more accommodation but the people in power in the united states have received way too much of that humility from watchdog press and that's one of the things we intend to rectify. >> sounds like you are promising a lot of scrutiny. not so much of the humility. glenn greenwald we appreciate you coming to talk to us about this. >> thank you, david, for having me. >> adversarial both directions. british authorities have accused greenwa greenwald's life partner of espionage for helping his reporting. we'll look at a new network hoping to fuse a younger demographic to habit of watching television news. she's agreed to give it up. that's today? [ male announcer ] we'll be with her all day to see how it goes. [ claira ] after the deliveries, i was okay. now the ciabatta is done and the pain is starting again.
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so i switched to purina cat chow healthy weight formula. i just fed the recommended amount... and they both loved the taste. after a few months max's "special powers" returned... and i got my hero back. purina cat chow healthy weight. overmany discounts to thine customers! [old english accent] safe driver, multi-car, paid in full -- a most fulsome bounty indeed, lord jamie. thou cometh and we thy saveth! what are you doing? we doth offer so many discounts, we have some to spare. oh, you have any of those homeowners discounts? here we go. thank you. he took my shield, my lady. these are troubling times in the kingdom. more discounts than we knoweth what to do with. now that's progressive. is caused by people looking fore traffic parking.y that's remarkable that so much energy is, is wasted.
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streetline has looked at the problem of parking, which has not been looked at for the last 30, 40 years, we wanted to rethink that whole industry, so we go and put out these sensors in each parking spot and then there's a mesh network that takes this information sends it over the internet so you can go find exactly where those open parking spots are. the collaboration with citi was important for providing us the necessary financing; allow this small start-up to go provide a service to municipalities. citi has been an incredible source of advice, how to engage with municipalities, how to structure deals, and as we think about internationally, citi is there every step of the way. so the end result is you reduce congestion, you reduce pollution and you provide a service to merchants, and that certainly is huge. we know in the cyber world, threats are always evolving. at first, we were protecting networks. then, we were protecting the transfer of data. and today it's evolved to infrastructure...
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♪ ...finance... and military missions. we're constantly innovating to advance the front line in the cyber battle, wherever it takes us. that's the value of performance. northrop grumman. >> spanish speaking channels like univision have dominated hispanic viewers. they have now joined to create
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fusion aimed at millennials. a hard to please demographic. a fascinating move but not ga t guaranteed for success. we turn to christina norman, media strategist and here in washington i'm joined by mark hugo lopez. mark, christina, thank you for joining us. mark, kick us off by sketching out the demographic challenge to u univision on one hand and abc on the other. >> the population in the u.s. is changing in many ways. one in terms of where people are born and language they speak. look at young latinos under the age of 18, 90% were born in the united states. you look at 18 to 29, it's two-thirds. for the other part of the latino population, the majority were born abroad and they speak spanish and they tend to get their news from only one source, which is generally spanish television news. young people are doing something
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different. they are looking to many different sources. internet, television, et cetera and english is often the language of choice among young people when it comes to consuming news and entertainment like television or music. they prefer english. >> as a programmer, as someone who runs major networks, tell me about what you think of what you've seen so far from fusion. >> i think fusion is really exciting. they tapped into something that is going to have success. that's really growing. one interesting statistic that i've seen is that the youth population that identifies themselves as multiracial has grown by 50% since 2000. there's now the fastest growing youth segment in this country right now. those are the kind of people that fusion is looking to attract. they are off to great start. >> is that a strong enough niche or am i thinking of it too minu minutely. >> i don't think it's just a news channel. they have positioned themselves
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as news, pop culture, satire and partnership with disney is key to the success. the disney channel has for years attracted hispanic audiences and they've been -- they were one of the leaders in making sure their programming was available on abc network and s.a.p. look at disney channel, those shows are cast with a very multiracial group of young people. those are the people that grew up watching those shows. this is the next step with fusion. >> as you look at this and think of the ways in which this generation of latinos are perhaps straying from pattern sit by parents and grandparents, don't they also, however, reflect the same disconnect with major outlets that their not latino peers do and many turn away from cable tv and away from tv in general. >> that's exactly right. we see that in data we have been looking at when it comes to news consumptions. young latinos going to many different news sources. it's less important for them
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than parents. young latinos today grow up in a world where identity is really being emphasizeded in a way the parents didn't quite see when they were growing up. that's something else i think is timely with fusion's launch but reflects differences that makes today's latinos unique. >> there are other news organizations now present that may not have been a decade ago that reflect an international or multicultural sensibility. al jazeera and america and bbc stronger in america than it once was. will this appeal to latinos because of its specific focus or is it a question of just being more broadly engaged with the world around? >> a combination of both. young latinos with what we have seen are really looking for and following things that are related to the community but have that u.s. somewhat broader young people in america with diversity that that's also part of what they're looking for as well. >> christina, what kinds of stories would you expect fusion over time to take a lead on and show the way for other news organizations in their focus as a way of appealing to this
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demographic and as a way of serving it. >> obviously you'll expect them to explore immigration and issues around jobs. but i also think what's going to be interesting about what fusion does is the i think that's one of the places in which they can forge a unique identity which is by making sure that they're covering these stories from the millennial point of view, using the sources millennials use to get the information, making sure they're all over social media. those are going to be ways in which they connect with this audience. >> and mark, quickly, do you think that this is going to ultimately over time be trumped as a her mill een -- a more millennial outlet, or will it keep its latino flavor? >> i think the latino flavor will be part of it because latinos are such a big part of the millennial generation. moving forward, i expect that to continue. i think you'll see latino culture become a large part of
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medicaleni e millennial culture as they become a growing part of the population. >> the growing part of the population is becoming a subsection of the fastest growing part of the population, correct? >> correct. one in five 18 to 29-year-olds today are hispanic. when you look at those under the age of 5, it's more than one in four. >> terrific stuff. christina, norman, i appreciate you coming in in los angeles. mark hugo lopez, thanks for coming here into studio. up next, breaking news and bad information. they seem as inseparable as batman and robin. why should we accept that? my customers can shop around-- see who does good work and compare costs. it doesn't usually work that way with health care. but with unitedhealthcare, i get information on quality rated doctors, treatment options and estimates for how much i'll pay. that helps me, and my guys, make better decisions. i don't like guesses with my business, and definitely not with our health. innovations that work for you. that's health in numbers.
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unitedhealthcare. explaining my moderate to severe so there i was again, chronic plaque psoriasis to another new stylist. it was a total embarrassment. and not the kind of attention i wanted. so i had a serious talk with my dermatologist about my treatment options. this time, she prescribed humira-adalimumab. humira helps to clear the surface of my skin by actually working inside my body. in clinical trials, most adults with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis saw 75% skin clearance. and the majority of people were clear or almost clear in just 4 months. humira can lower your ability to fight infections, including tuberculosis. serious, sometimes fatal events, such as infections, lymphoma, or other types of cancer have happened. blood, liver and nervous system problems, serious allergic reactions, and new or worsening heart failure have occurred. before starting humira, your doctor should test you for tb. ask your doctor if you live in or have been to a region where certain fungal infections are common.
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really? that's our tide. what's yours?
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to err is human. in that case, maybe reporters and producers covering breaking news are more human than most. the shooting at l.a.x. airport in los angeles, while tragic on its merits, brings fresh proof. nbc news had to correct its tweet and a report on cnbc that the gunman had been killed. he hadn't. a tweet from a stunt account claimed the a.p. and reuters were claiming former director michael hayden had been killed. there hadn't been a report, and
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he is very much alive. the "toronto globe" and others fell for that. joining subcommittee media critic at the "washington post." don't -- some at "politico" say at this point in breaking news it doesn't matter if people get things wrong. does it? >> i don't know. in this case we didn't misidentify the assailant as we did in newtown -- >> that's going for it. >> maybe this is a win. i mean, and one of the main media outlittle that stumbled in this -- outlets that stumbomac n this is canada, out of my -- >> is this a win, we had those things wrong? there were implications early on in the number of reports that the shooter might be a -- a tsa employee. these things come out in the first minutes and hours that seem to misdirect the attention of the public. why shouldn't that matter? >> my point is there are two cat divorce of mistakes in a live -- categories of mistakes in a live broadcast. one is a mistake on fact the
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other is a mistake with a person. if you misidentify the person, in other words, in the newtown shooting, we thought that ryan lanza was the assailant finisor while when it was adam. that affects a person. big deal. also with the navy yard, cbs and nbc said it was someone whom we won't name that it turned out not to be. that affects that person's lives. as we learn later when report said the guy was freaking out. >> sure. >> the other mistakes like, say, the wrong weapon, other atmospherics aren't as consequential. >> i mean, you know, why shouldn't viewers and readers have the expectation that the places they're turning for authoritative information will get it right and will, in fact, be authoritative on this? >> they should. i'm not minimizing those other errors. i'm saying which are fireable offenses and which are sort of offenses that should prompt news organizations to take a really good look at what they're doing.
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the problem is that authorities just like news organizations are dealing with preliminary information. in the case with the ar-15 at the shooting with the reports, an ar-15 assault rifle, they were wrong, they were taking it from internal bulletins. the fbi was saying the ar-15 was involved. that was wrong. everybody is scrounging for information at this point. >> if you're, you know, if mr. eric wimple blog is running the social media for organizations such as your own or mine, what is the point at which you're willing to pull the trigger on information? are you willing to say we have information that may yet prove to be true, or would you rather hold back as others put things on line and on the air to make sure that something actually can be sourced on the record to something authoritative? >> i want on the record official confirmation of anything involving a name. short of that, three sources on any -- three different sources, not sources -- >> three different sources.
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>> yes. three different sources. one of the things that's a huge problem with this is oftentimes you have local law enforcement officials working on a story. whether it's boston, l.a., d.c., and the federal overlay at the same time. >> you have a multiplicity of sources. hard to get right. >> sometimes they're all getting the information from one source. >> in a sense, our expectations should be crafted differently in these evolving and erupting scenarios it sounds like. >> never, ever is it forgivable to screw up a name, never. >> it sound like another circumstance is what george w. bush referred to as the soft bigotry of low expectations. from the "washington post," eric, thank you for joining me today. "reliable sources" has added a correction koecorner to its b where you can see where news reporters are correcting mistakes. you can go to cnnreliable o or #reliable. that's it for "reliable
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sources." if you missed any of today's program, you can find it on itunes. join us next sunday at 11:00 a.m. eastern. "state of the union with candy crowley" begins right now. the week in numbers -- six. the number of americans said to have signed up for obama care on day one. 42, the president's approval rating. today, barack obama's downturn. the beginning of his lame duck era,or a temporary slump? >> come january 1st, and thereafter when real people regardless of politics are getting better services and better benefits and more security, this is going to be a different story. >> other numbers -- 22, the percentage of americans with a favorable view of republicans. after the government shutdown, after the obama care rollout, we assess the political landscape with republican senator kelly ayotte. 365, the number of days until

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